Summer Reading List: 2010 Edition

The time has come for me to start putting together my summer reading list! Like last year, I’ll probably deviate extensively from it, and hopefully manage to complete at least half of the books on it.

I’ve noticed that my list has a couple of themes, being either Italian focused (or influenced by my stay in Florence) or dystopian. And some are just random.

Confessions–St Augustine

Decameron–Boccaccio

New Testament

Inferno–Dante (finish reading!)

1984–George Orwell (reread)

Brave New World–Alduos Huxley (reread)

Fahrenheit 451–Ray Bradbury (definite reread–I read this once, in the seventh grade)

The Shining– Stephen King

Let the Right One In–John Lindqvist

One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest–Ken Kesey

Any other suggestions? I recently read a couple of really poorly composed books and need to purge my mind of the awful taste.

In some cases, like 1984, Brave New World and Fahrenheit 451, these are books that I read for school years ago. Now that I’m older (and perhaps a little wiser), I hope to get something more out of them, and just enjoy them without having to worry about needing to remember details for exams and essays.

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8 thoughts on “Summer Reading List: 2010 Edition

  1. In addition to Brave New World you should also read Brave New World Revisited, written by Huxley as a “second opinion” to the things he raised in his most famous novel. He’s admirably fearless in some of the points he makes, and the two books stand as a wonderful statement on where society is going.

  2. You’d probably like A Canticle for Leibowitz. I read it for my essay on God in science fiction in high school. The premise is that a nuclear holocaust destroyed most written records of the world as it was, and group of monks are preserving the ancient texts that can provide humanity with the ability to move on. I think you’d like it.

    1. Ooh, that sounds really good! I’ll check it out.

      And I remember those essays…I should probably reread some Hawthorne. 🙂

      1. Yes, A Canticle for Leibowitz is quite good. I recommend it as well. Also, check out Umberto Eco’s The Name of the Rose if you haven’t already. The movie starring Sean Connery doesn’t do it justice.

      1. That’s definitely true. I think I read it once over a decade ago; I should pick it up again. Know any good translations?

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